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CULINARY COUP . . .

Cooking Vacations in Italy - Recipes From Roma

Visit: www.cooking-vacations.com for Fabulous Italian Cooking Vacations in Italy.

Recipes below are from Cooking Vacation Chefs -- Mangia Bene!

Saltimbocca Di Vitello Alla Romana ~ Roman-Style Veal Saltimbocca

Courtesy of Chef Eugenio in our Roman Holiday cooking tour

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 600 g Veal, sliced thinly about 70 g to 80 g per slice
  • 8 slices Prosciutto di Parma
  • Flour, as needed
  • 80 g Extra virgin olive oil
  • Sage, several leaves
  • Salt & pepper, to taste
  • 1 glass White wine
  • 1 tsp Butter

Pound the veal slices with a meat mallet until they are about 5mm thick. Lay out the slices on a work surface. On each veal slice, place a sage leaf, a slice of prosciutto and use toothpicks to fasten together. Dust with flour on both sides. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. In a large sauté pan, heat extra virgin olive oil until very hot. Add the veal slices, prosciutto-side down, and a few additional sage leaves. Cook until you see the edges of the veal starting to turn light brown in color, then use a spatula to turn over and cook on the other side.

When the veal no longer sticks to the pan, add the glass of white wine, allow to evaporate completely and then add the butter. Reduce heat to low and allow to finish cooking another moment until the butter is fully melted.

Carciofi alla Romana~Roman-Style Artichokes

Serves 8

Ingredients

  • 8 artichokes
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/4 cup Parsley, chopped
  • 1/4 cup Mint, chopped
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoon Olive oil plus extra for finishing dash of dry white wine

Discard the tough outer leaves and chop the stems of the artichokes off just below the bases. Firmly press each artichoke upside down on the counter to make it “bloom.” Scoop out the choke (the hairy white part) and place the cleaned artichokes in a bowl of water with the juice of 1 lemon squeezed in. This prevents the inside of the artichokes from becoming an unappetizing greyish-brown when exposed to the air.

Mix together garlic, lemon, herbs, and olive oil. Take artichokes out of lemon bath, rub the mixture inside, spooning out any extra. Salt and pepper liberally. Place artichokes side by side, like soldiers at attention, upside in a heavy-bottomed pot with 1 1/2 – 2 inches of water and a dash of wine. You want the artichokes close enough together so that they can’t tip over and bob around.

Cover the top of the pot with a damp paper towel and place a tight-fitting lid over that – this is to prevent any steam from escaping. Cook on medium for 30-40 minutes. The artichokes are ready when a fork pierces them easily. Remove the artichokes from the pot and set on a plate to cool. Once they are lukewarm, drizzle olive oil over them. You want to wait to add the oil until the artichokes have cooled a bit so that they don’t immediately suck it up and become soggy.

Cooking Conversions from Cooking Vacations: Conversion Table below.

Weight Equivalents:

Volume Equivalents: Temperature Equivalents:
American Metric American Metric American

(Fahrenheit)

Metric

(Celsius)

1/4 oz 7g 1/4 t 1.2 ml 32 0
1/2 oz 15g 1/2 t 2.5 ml 225 110
1 oz 30g 1 t 5.0 ml 250 120
2 oz 60g 1/2 T (1.5 t) 7.5 ml 275 135
3 oz 90g 1 T (3 t) 15 ml 300 150
4 oz 115g 1/4 cup (4 T) 60 ml 325 165
5 oz 150g 1/3 cup (5 T) 75 ml 350 175
6 oz 175g 1/2 cup (8 T) 125 ml 375 190
7 oz 200g 2/3 cup (10 T) 150 ml 400 205
8 oz (1/2 lb) 225g 3/4 cup (12 T) 175 ml 425 220
9 oz 250g 1 cup (16 T) 250 ml 450 230
10 oz 300g 1 1/4 cups 300 ml 475 245
11 oz 325g 1 1/2 cups 350 ml
12 oz 350g 2 cups (1 pt) 500 ml
13 oz 375g 2 1/2 cups 625 ml
14 oz 400g 1 quart 1 liter
15 oz 425g
16 oz (1 lb) 450g
1 1/2 lb 750g
2 lb 900g
2 1/4 lb 1 Kg
3 lb 1.4 Kg
4 lb 1.8 Kg

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The new Le Cordon Bleu Paris institute welcomes its first intake of students alongside the river Seine

 

 Le Cordon Bleu, the leading global network of culinary arts and hospitality management institutes, welcomes its first intake of students to its new campus, on June 22nd.
 
Founded in Paris in 1895, Le Cordon Bleu has recently taken up home in a new 4 000 m2 establishment in the 15th district, next to Beaugrenelle shopping centre and opposite the statue of Liberty. The new building will welcome more than 1 000 students, of more than 100 different nationalities, every year, to carry out training in the fields of gastronomy, wine, hospitality and tourism, from initiation level through to Bachelor Degree.
 
The new institute will provide students with ultramodern, high-tech equipment, with emphasis on the use of digital systems. Designed by the Gabrielli - Pierres - Primard architectural firm, the building’s design, in aluminium and glass, was envisaged with the latest environmental norms in mind, enabling it to be eco-friendly.
 
One of the innovations in the new premises is the roof, which has been transformed into an energy autonomous vegetable garden, measuring more than 800 m². The garden allows students to learn about how fruit, vegetables, herbs and edible flowers are grown in an urban setting. It also supplies some of the fresh ingredients for cuisine lessons. Beehives also provide the institute with honey.
 
Le Cordon Bleu Paris in figures:
  • A total of 18 classrooms for cuisine, pastry and boulangerie, and management.
  • 1 cellar-style room dedicated to wine.
  • 1 room dedicated to Asian cuisine.
  • 1 workshop dedicated to individual or group lessons for cuisine amateurs.
  • 1 student area with multimedia equipment and a large library with a wide selection of international culinary books and magazines.
  • 1 boutique with a range of gourmet products and gifts, all carefully selected by Le Cordon Bleu Chefs, as well as an array of cuisine and pastry equipment.
  • 1 Café – Official opening in September 2016.
To see a video of the new campus, or Le Cordon Bleu professional Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management programmes, click on the following links:
 
Practical information:
-        New address: Le Cordon Bleu, 13-15 Quai André Citroën, 75015 Paris
-        Professional programmes: http://www.cordonbleu.edu/paris/programmes/en
 
About Le Cordon Bleu International
With more than 120 years of teaching experience, Le Cordon Bleu is the leading Global Network of Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management Institutes, training 20 000 students of more than 90 nationalities every year. Le Cordon Bleu offers a range of widely-recognized training programmes in the fields of gastronomy, wine, hospitality and tourism, from initiation in culinary techniques through to MBA.
 
Follow us on:

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6th ANNUAL LOS ANGELES FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL RETURNS

AUGUST 25-28, 2016

 Michelin starred honorees, James Beard Award winners, Food & Wine Best New Chefs, and 200 wineries, will once again converge on the City of Angels during the annual epicurean jubilee produced by Coastal Luxury Management

   The sixth annual Los Angeles Food & Wine Festival, presented with founding partners FOOD & WINE and Lexus, is set to feature three-nights and four-days of unrivalled tastings, dinners, lunches, seminars, book signings, cooking demonstrations, and special events, showcasing the finest in food and drink culture.
In past years, the star-studded lineup has included 2016 James Beard Award winners Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo as well as celebrated chefs Daniel Boulud, Thomas Keller, Jonathan Waxman, Tyler Florence, Curtis Stone, Giada De Laurentiis, Grant Achatz, , Rick Bayless, Duff Goldman, Michelle Bernstein, Wolfgang Puck, Nancy Silverton, Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto, Michael Symon, Roy Choi, Michael Chiarello, Scott Conant, Carlo Mirachi, Michael Voltaggio, Robert Irvine, Guy Fieri, Fabio Viviani, Jet Tila, Andrew Zimmern and Graham Elliot, plus local favorites Tim Hollingsworth, Michael Cimarusti, Bruce Kalman, David LeFevre, Jessica Koslow, Ludo Lefebvre, Neal Fraser, Ori Menashe, Walter Manzke, Jason Neroni, Josef Centeno, Sang Yoon, Ricardo Zarate, Ben Ford, Alvin Cailan and Ray Garcia, to name a few.

 

In addition to the extraordinary culinary talent on-hand, Los Angeles Food & Wine has been lauded for its headlining musical performances from award-wining artists, including Questlove and The Roots, Beastie Boys founding member Mike D, 2015 Academy Award-winner Common, and Grammy-nominee Gavin DeGraw.

 

In the next several weeks, the festival will be announcing confirmed programming and participants for 2016.  Please continue to check www.LAFW.com for updates!

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Top 10 Cookbooks of all time

 
 
 

Spring is without a doubt one of my favorite times of year. The weather takes a turn for the better, flowers begin to bloom, markets overflow with fresh produce and both the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) and the James Beard House announce the annual awards to new cook books within the culinary world.

Many of the books I’ve collected in my library have been either IACP or James Beard award recipients. While I always look forward to this season for the new book arrivals, I can’t help but wander back to the classics which have shaped all our lives in the kitchen. 

Here are the top ten books that I would highlight as the most influential literature on cooking since printing began. They vary extensively in term of date and focus and all of them are essential reading.

1. Bartolomeo Scappi “Opera” (1570)A cook to cardinals and the Pope, Scappi applies renaissance order to the scattered art of cookery.

2. Hannah Wooley “The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet” (1670)A trailblazer in the United States, this book was re-printed many times.

3. Antonin Carême “L’Art de la Cuisine Française” 5 volumes (1833-47)A chef to kings and statesmen – Carême masterminded international cuisine in the aftermath of the French Revolution.

4. Auguste Escoffier “Le Guide Culinare” (1902)Cooks still consult Escoffier. He reduced French cooking to shorthand which made a huge repertoire of dishes in the kitchen.

5. James Beard “Delights and Prejudices” (1964)The title sums it up. Jim Beard brings to life the simple pleasures of the table.’

6. Elizabeth David “French Provincial Cooking” (1962): Elizabeth is as much a great essayist as cook and the combination is irresistible.

7. Julia Child “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” (1963)The title tells it all. Julia is a master of communicating her thrill when cooking in the kitchen.

8. Harold McGee “On Food and Cooking” (1984)Harold reveals a very contemporary inside look at food chemistry.

9. Alan Davidson “Oxford Companion to Food” (1999)Alan’s curiosity and quirky sense of humor leads to the most authoritative food dictionary of our generation.

10. Nathan Myrhvold “Modernist Cuisine” (2001)Nathan has the brilliance to pin down images and text. Modernist Cuisine has inspired and shocked the current generation of chefs.

- See more at: http://lavarenne.com/2016/04/top-10-cookbooks-of-all-time/#sthash.AIKMqJaI.dpuf

Top 10 Cookbooks of all time

 
 
 

Spring is without a doubt one of my favorite times of year. The weather takes a turn for the better, flowers begin to bloom, markets overflow with fresh produce and both the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) and the James Beard House announce the annual awards to new cook books within the culinary world.

Many of the books I’ve collected in my library have been either IACP or James Beard award recipients. While I always look forward to this season for the new book arrivals, I can’t help but wander back to the classics which have shaped all our lives in the kitchen. 

Here are the top ten books that I would highlight as the most influential literature on cooking since printing began. They vary extensively in term of date and focus and all of them are essential reading.

1. Bartolomeo Scappi “Opera” (1570)A cook to cardinals and the Pope, Scappi applies renaissance order to the scattered art of cookery.

2. Hannah Wooley “The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet” (1670)A trailblazer in the United States, this book was re-printed many times.

3. Antonin Carême “L’Art de la Cuisine Française” 5 volumes (1833-47)A chef to kings and statesmen – Carême masterminded international cuisine in the aftermath of the French Revolution.

4. Auguste Escoffier “Le Guide Culinare” (1902)Cooks still consult Escoffier. He reduced French cooking to shorthand which made a huge repertoire of dishes in the kitchen.

5. James Beard “Delights and Prejudices” (1964)The title sums it up. Jim Beard brings to life the simple pleasures of the table.’

6. Elizabeth David “French Provincial Cooking” (1962): Elizabeth is as much a great essayist as cook and the combination is irresistible.

7. Julia Child “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” (1963)The title tells it all. Julia is a master of communicating her thrill when cooking in the kitchen.

8. Harold McGee “On Food and Cooking” (1984)Harold reveals a very contemporary inside look at food chemistry.

9. Alan Davidson “Oxford Companion to Food” (1999)Alan’s curiosity and quirky sense of humor leads to the most authoritative food dictionary of our generation.

10. Nathan Myrhvold “Modernist Cuisine” (2001)Nathan has the brilliance to pin down images and text. Modernist Cuisine has inspired and shocked the current generation of chefs.

- See more at: http://lavarenne.com/2016/04/top-10-cookbooks-of-all-time/#sthash.AIKMqJaI.dpuf

Top 10 Cookbooks of all time

 
 
 

Spring is without a doubt one of my favorite times of year. The weather takes a turn for the better, flowers begin to bloom, markets overflow with fresh produce and both the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) and the James Beard House announce the annual awards to new cook books within the culinary world.

Many of the books I’ve collected in my library have been either IACP or James Beard award recipients. While I always look forward to this season for the new book arrivals, I can’t help but wander back to the classics which have shaped all our lives in the kitchen. 

Here are the top ten books that I would highlight as the most influential literature on cooking since printing began. They vary extensively in term of date and focus and all of them are essential reading.

1. Bartolomeo Scappi “Opera” (1570)A cook to cardinals and the Pope, Scappi applies renaissance order to the scattered art of cookery.

2. Hannah Wooley “The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet” (1670)A trailblazer in the United States, this book was re-printed many times.

3. Antonin Carême “L’Art de la Cuisine Française” 5 volumes (1833-47)A chef to kings and statesmen – Carême masterminded international cuisine in the aftermath of the French Revolution.

4. Auguste Escoffier “Le Guide Culinare” (1902)Cooks still consult Escoffier. He reduced French cooking to shorthand which made a huge repertoire of dishes in the kitchen.

5. James Beard “Delights and Prejudices” (1964)The title sums it up. Jim Beard brings to life the simple pleasures of the table.’

6. Elizabeth David “French Provincial Cooking” (1962): Elizabeth is as much a great essayist as cook and the combination is irresistible.

7. Julia Child “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” (1963)The title tells it all. Julia is a master of communicating her thrill when cooking in the kitchen.

8. Harold McGee “On Food and Cooking” (1984)Harold reveals a very contemporary inside look at food chemistry.

9. Alan Davidson “Oxford Companion to Food” (1999)Alan’s curiosity and quirky sense of humor leads to the most authoritative food dictionary of our generation.

10. Nathan Myrhvold “Modernist Cuisine” (2001)Nathan has the brilliance to pin down images and text. Modernist Cuisine has inspired and shocked the current generation of chefs.

- See more at: http://lavarenne.com/2016/04/top-10-cookbooks-of-all-time/#sthash.AIKMqJaI.dpuf

Broadmoor NEW logo

 

John Johnstone C.M.C. Joins The Broadmoor as Vice President of Food & Beverage


As The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs approaches its Centennial in 2018, it is honored to announce the naming of John Johnstone, C.M.C., as Vice President of Food & Beverage. Mr. Johnstone will oversee not only the resort, but overall food and beverage operations at The Broadmoor Wilderness properties of The Ranch at Emerald Valley, Cloud Camp, The Broadmoor Fishing Camp and Seven Falls.

John Johnstone VP Food and Beverage 2016Most recently, Mr. Johnstone served as Director of Club Operations at the esteemed Augusta National Golf Club, home of the Masters®. There he was in charge of club house operations, as well as all Masters Tournament food and beverage operations. This encompassed the support and direction of all hospitality operations including concessions, luxury sponsor cabins and suites and 24 separate venues for members, players and patron dining. His extensive resume also includes serving in pre-opening varying leadership capacities with Ritz-Carltons in Washington D.C., Boston, Sarasota, Greensboro, Georgia, and Los Angeles. Internationally, the list is extensive and includes Bali, Milan, Dubai, Thailand, as well as multiple properties in China.  

Born and raised in Scotland, Mr. Johnstone received his degree from Clydebank College in Glasgow. He underwent his traditional apprenticeship working under several European 3-star Michelin chefs including Marco Pierre White and John Burton Race. Chef Johnstone was awarded his Certified Master Chef (C.M.C.) distinction from the American Culinary Federation in 2003; he served as Team Captain for the United Kingdom Epicurean World Master Chef’s Society, as well as Team Captain for the American Culinary Federation’s Team Long Island. From 2006 to 2009, Mr. Johnstone also served as Culinary Advisor for the USA Olympic Team.  

“I could not be more delighted than to have Chef Johnstone join The Broadmoor family as we move toward our 100th anniversary in 2018, “said Mr. Damioli. “I had the privilege of working with him at the Greenbrier, and we have kept in touch all these years. His extensive experience is a perfect fit; his collaborative nature and commitment to continued best practices, products and services will help shape our deep and varied food and beverage program now, and for years to come. Chef Johnstone is one of only 65 certified Master Chefs. I cannot think of a more perfect person to lead The Broadmoor food and beverage team into our next millennium.”

Retiring Director of Food and Beverage C.W. Craig Reed added, “I have been very fortunate to have been a part of this great hotel for the past 25 years. Because of my long history here, I am very pleased to welcome John Johnstone to the team here at The Broadmoor. I have had the pleasure of knowing John for many years. He is the consummate professional, and his leadership and talent will no doubt lead The Broadmoor to new heights.”

Chef Johnstone will be joined at The Broadmoor by his wife, Annie, along with two sons - Brody, age 19, who is an honor student at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, and Fyfe, age 12, who is a middle school student.

“I am truly honored and excited to join The Broadmoor family and I look forward to many years of contributing to the world-class excellence that The Broadmoor is known for,” said Mr. Johnstone. “To be part of such a talented team is a privilege for me and I am excited to embark on the challenges and successes ahead of us.”

About The Broadmoor:
The Broadmoor is the longest consecutive winner of the Forbes Five-Star and AAA Five-Diamond awards for excellence. Situated at the gateway to the Colorado Rocky Mountains in Colorado Springs, the resort and Wilderness properties combined encompass 5,000 acres. The resort campus has 779 rooms and suites and includes three championship golf courses, a Forbes Five-Star spa and fitness center, nationally recognized tennis staff and program, 26 retail boutiques and 10 restaurants, including Colorado’s only Forbes Five-Star, AAA Five - Diamond restaurant Penrose Room, and 10 cafes and lounges. The new “BROADMOOR Wilderness Experience” encompasses The Broadmoor’s Ranch at Emerald Valley, Cloud Camp and The BROADMOOR Fishing Camp. Broadmoor attractions include the Pikes Peak Cog Railway, Seven Falls and The Broadmoor Soaring Adventure. Colorado Springs is serviced with non-stop flights via Alaska Airlines, Allegiant, American, Delta, Frontier and United. With connections to worldwide destinations, Denver International Airport hosts more than 1,600 national and international flights daily.
 

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NEW FOOD STOPS IN OTTAWA

  • NEW! Chef Marc Lepine, the chef-owner of Ottawa’s ever-inventive Atelier restaurant, has won the national Gold Medal Plates culinary competition. In fact, he’s the first chef to ever win twice (he also won in 2012). The best part of this story, though, is that several local Ottawa chefs collaborated to keep Atelier open while Marc and his team travelled to compete. They did this back in 2012 as well.

  • NEW! An upscale yet casual Lebanese restaurant called Fairouz opens in spring 2016 in downtown Ottawa. Chef Walid El-Tawel, formerly the head chef at Restaurant e18hteen, will be in the kitchen.

  • NEW! The Toronto-based Culinary Adventure Company plans to expand into Ottawa in 2016. Meanwhile, culinary walking tours of various Ottawa neighbourhoods with C’est Bon Cooking will continue under new ownership in 2016.

  • NEW! In Perth (about an hour’s drive southwest of Ottawa), Top Shelf Distillers is now offering gin, vodka, whisky and “moonshine.”

  • NEW! Jon Svazas, the owner of the acclaimed Fauna restaurant on Bank Street in downtown Ottawa, plans to open a Spanish- and Mediterranean-themed restaurant (as yet unnamed) in spring 2016 in the former location of Back Lane Café in the Wellington West neighbourhood.

  • NEW! Strathmere, in rural southwest Ottawa, has launched a new Retreat Café to complement its meeting and wedding facilities. Open to the public, the café incorporates many of the products grown or produced on-site (honey, fruits and vegetables). Also new: the Retreat Spa, with daily yoga classes, mani and pedi stations, outdoor hot tubs, and relaxation areas.

  • NEW! In the ByWard Market neighbourhood, a former Catholic church—repurposed into an Irish cultural centre and special events venue—now boasts a bar in the basement! Brigid’s Well burns a blue light outside its massive wood doors to indicate it’s open.

  • NEW! Two great new additions are coming to downtown Elgin Street in spring 2016: The Whalesbone Oyster House opens a larger space (the original on Bank Street is tiny!), and Westboro neighbourhood stalwart Pure Kitchen restaurant takes over the former location of Maxwell’s.

  • NEW! As if chef/owner Matthew Carmichael’s El Camino taco joint and Elgin Street neighbour, Asian-themed Datsun, weren’t busy enough, he’s now planning a third location in spring 2016, called Riviera, on Sparks Street in a beautiful Art Deco former bank building.

  • NEW! In the redeveloped Lansdowne Park part of the Glebe neighbourhood, check out locally owned Crust and Crate Public House for their wood-fired pizzas and craft beer and SEN Asian Fusion for Vietnamese, Thai and Chinese specialties. The newest option (spring 2016) is CRAFT Beer Market, with over 100 beers on tap!

    Visit: www.ottawatourism.ca

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Text

Idaho® Potato and White Bean Skordalia is an easy two-step dip that goes perfectly with crunchy vegetables or chips

The Idaho Potato Commission (IPC) has just released three new and unique gluten-free recipes for those avoiding wheat and flour-based ingredients. Idaho® Potato and White Bean Skordalia; Russian Beet, Idaho® Potato Salad; and Idaho® Potato South African Curried Meatloaf (Bobotie) use naturally gluten-free, Idaho® potatoes as the main ingredient and taste so good, even folks not monitoring their gluten intake will enjoy them.
 
“In addition to the Idaho® potato’s impressive nutritional profile, it’s also naturally gluten-free,” explained Frank Muir, President and CEO, IPC. “During Celiac Awareness Month we want to remind consumers who are gluten-sensitive that Idaho® potatoes are a great and healthy staple for their diets.”
 
The IPC’s new recipes are easy to make and can be enjoyed by the entire family. Idaho® Potato and White Bean Skordalia requires only a food processor and a few minutes of time. The result: a puree that tastes like garlic mashed potatoes drizzled with olive oil. Use chopped bell peppers, carrots and celery stalks to scoop up the dip, making this a super-nutritious snack or appetizer. Idaho® Potato South African Curried Meatloaf (aka Bobotie) is a South African meat dish with a baked egg custard topping that uses ingredients you probably already have in your pantry. And, if you want to wake up your taste buds, try Russian Beet and Idaho® Potato Salad, which is a great accompaniment to any protein.
 
To view these and other gluten-free recipes, please visit https://idahopotato.com.

Idaho® Potato and White Bean Skordalia (Greek potato-garlic dip)

Servings: 6
 
Ingredients:
 
·      3 garlic cloves
·      1 medium (about 8 ounces) Idaho® potato, baked or boiled, cooled, and peeled*
·      1 tablespoon cider vinegar
·      2 tablespoons olive oil
·      6 pimento-stuffed green olives
·      1/4 teaspoon salt
 
Directions:
 
1.       If desired, microwave the garlic for 20 seconds to soften the flavor.
2.       In a food processor or blender, combine garlic, potato, vinegar, oil, olives and salt and process until smooth. For a thinner consistency, add 2-3 tablespoons of water to the mixture.
 
*Cook’s Tip: For a quick-cook potato, pierce potato in several areas, wrap in a paper towel and microwave on high for 6 minutes or until tender when pierced with a fork.
 
 
Estimated Nutritional Analysis per Serving: 73 calories, 5 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 7 g carbohydrates, 1 g dietary fiber, 0 g total sugars, 1 g protein, 182 mg sodium, 164 mg potassium, 9 mg calcium
 
 

About The Idaho Potato Commission

Established in 1937, the IPC is a state agency that is responsible for promoting and protecting the famous "Grown in Idaho®" seal, a federally registered certification mark that assures consumers they are purchasing genuine, top-quality Idaho® potatoes. Idaho's growing season of warm days and cool nights, ample mountain-fed irrigation and rich volcanic soil, give Idaho® potatoes their unique texture, taste and dependable performance, which differentiates them from potatoes grown in other states.

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NOLA DELICIOUS RECIPE FOR SUMMER

Jacques-Imo's Fried Chicken Recipe

       

Jacque-Imo's Fried Chicken Recipe PinterestStart to Finish: 8 hours, 50 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients:
1 whole chicken (about 4 pounds), cut into 8 pieces
Salt and freshly ground white pepper
Canola or safflower oil
4 large eggs
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1/2 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup minced garlic
Ruffled dill pickle slices

Preparation:
Season the chicken liberally with salt and white pepper, place in a resealable plastic bag and refrigerate overnight.

Prepare a deep-fryer or fill a large pot (at least 8-quart) halfway with oil and heat to 350 degrees F. In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, evaporated milk, Worcestershire sauce, and salt to taste. In a separate bowl, season the flour with salt to taste. Dip the chicken in the egg wash, then coat in the seasoned flour, shaking off the excess. Working in batches, fry the chicken until golden and crisp, 11 to 12 minutes for the wings and drumsticks, 14 to 16 minutes for the thighs and 18 to 20 minutes for the breasts.

To serve, garnish with the chopped parsley, minced garlic and pickles.

(Recipe from Fried & True: 50 Recipes for America's Best Fried Chicken and Sides, by Lee Brian Schrager with Adeena Sussman)

 


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© 2008 Bonnie Carroll, All Rights Reserved